RUNAWAY TRUCK RAMP

whiskerbiscuitbakery:

koolthing:

howtobesummergoth:

typical ric flair interviews

INTENSE

Saw him once walking through the airport in Charlotte. He was talking on his cellphone, just him, no one with him. And he was in full wrestling character, voice and mannerism.

I wonder how much is put on and how much is really him. After the airport sighting, I lean heavily on the that’s really him side of that equation.

I met Ric Flair (along with Batista and Triple H) once at a strip club and again at a South Carolina football game. He was surprisingly chill and mild mannered. Both times you could tell he was hurried to get to wherever he was going, but he was very polite and spoke with everyone who wanted to speak to him. While a little bit of it peeked through, it was apparent that his “Nature Boy” persona wasn’t his “default” state of being. From what I know of him, I’ve got nothing bad or crazy to say about the man…

…except he doesn’t wash his hands after using the restroom. Gross.

bestrooftalkever:

In 2006 Guy Goma was in the BBC reception awaiting a job interview when he was mistaken for internet expert Guy Kewney. Karen Bowerman interviewed a bewildered Mr Goma live on air.

via Six of the Most Awkward TV interviews Ever Witnessed

Props for Mr. Goma for handling this extremely well. This is grade A bullshitting at its finest.

We’re less than a month away from seeing Clemson take the field again.

Can’t wait.

I Spent 15 Seconds Writing This Headline

misterhippity:

On The Daily Show, I just heard Neetzan “DailyWhat” Zimmerman estimate that he spent an average of 15 minutes composing each headline for his Gawker posts, and only five minutes writing the posts themselves. 

The upshot: What’s important is what people see before they click. What happens after they click isn’t worth worrying about too much. The text of the actual post may as well not even be

When I used to blog “full-time,” the worst part was choosing a catchy headline. I wanted people to read what I wrote and no one was going to read it unless I could come up with a cool header to reel them in.

Now? Who the fuck cares? I don’t even share most of my blog posts anymore. While I enjoy you guys reading my pieces, I write for my own sanity and well-being. Any incidental public benefit is purely accidental.

So yesterday I had the interview that I mentioned a few days ago.

All things considered, I think it went as good as it could have. Considering that my mindset was somewhere in between “I want to be professional and make a good impression” and “no fucks given,” it probably went better than it should have. When I have nothing to prove I can come off as very endearing and personable and that’s been my double-edged sword in the past. Anyways, we chit chatted, talked shop, and I was able to voice some of my concerns with morale and team unity. I left our meeting with no questions unanswered, which is a good thing.

As far as what I want to happen next, I honestly don’t know. They told me that they were interviewing 3 candidates and that I was the first. Considering that I’m fairly close to the last candidate, I know that they won’t be done interviewing until Thursday afternoon, which would put any potential offers out until midweek next week at the earliest. Would I want to be offered the job? Of course I would as everyone wants to be wanted, but do I really *want* the gig? I don’t know. I’ve mentioned a few times here and there about how I’m a little bored with my current routine. That said, I genuinely like my work environment and don’t mind spending the time there that I do. While the new position would some offer new opportunities I would like to take on, I am seriously concerned about being in a miserable work environment. I’ve been there before - thrice - and I really enjoy having that not “be a thing.”

Ah well. What’s done it is done and I’ll concern myself with crossing that bridge if my road ever winds up there. In the meantime, we’ve got a 13 hour drive to New England coming up that I need to begin mentally preparing myself for.

GPOYW: “Meh” Wednesday Edition

GPOYW: “Meh” Wednesday Edition

As far as I am concerned, NO ONE can actually hate The Miz and be a true wrestling fan

ghdos:

thefatgawd:

Dude was essentially one of you guys years ago and decided he wanted to be a WWE star and he made it.

How could you actually hate that guy?

He aight.

Meh. Hating the Miz requires caring about him being around.

The second trend is that whether a student graduates or not seems to depend today almost entirely on just one factor — how much money his or her parents make. To put it in blunt terms: Rich kids graduate; poor and working-class kids don’t. Or to put it more statistically: About a quarter of college freshmen born into the bottom half of the income distribution will manage to collect a bachelor’s degree by age 24, while almost 90 percent of freshmen born into families in the top income quartile will go on to finish their degree.

When you read about those gaps, you might assume that they mostly have to do with ability. Rich kids do better on the SAT, so of course they do better in college. But ability turns out to be a relatively minor factor behind this divide. If you compare college students with the same standardized-test scores who come from different family backgrounds, you find that their educational outcomes reflect their parents’ income, not their test scores. Take students like Vanessa, who do moderately well on standardized tests — scoring between 1,000 and 1,200 out of 1,600 on the SAT. If those students come from families in the top-income quartile, they have a 2 in 3 chance of graduating with a four-year degree. If they come from families in the bottom quartile, they have just a 1 in 6 chance of making it to graduation.

Over the weekend, my boss sent this piece to my coworkers and I to read at our leisure. I found it to be an interesting selection to send out as our school is a) not really diverse b) expensive, but nevertheless, it was still good information to be aware of.